Coaching Week returns to help communities thrive


CIMSPA fully supports UK Coaching with this endeavour which shares our vision of a recognised and respected workforce in our sector. All the way from grassroots level up to elite athletes, coaches play a pivotal role in the development of the nations sporting success stories, physical health and wellbeing and as such, should be celebrated.



This year, the awareness campaign – which empowers athletes, coaches and the general public to celebrate coaching – will showcase how great coaching creates the conditions for communities to thrive, inspiring a movement that brings more great coaching to more local communities.

Momentum for the campaign will build on the first weekend of June before kicking off officially from the 3-9 June.

The inaugural Coaching Week took place in 2018 and received huge support from key sporting organisations, national and regional media and the wider coaching community. During the week, UK Coaching launched its Principles of Great Coaching - to help everyone in the UK recognise and celebrate when great coaching takes place.

This year the campaign will adopt a much more specific focus, demonstrating the value of coaching to communities, and how coaching improves social connections and well-being.

Coaching Week involves all people and places where sport and physical activity can take place. Everyone can get involved – from schools to charities to businesses – each group can play their part in recognising the people who provide great coaching to their communities. After all, it doesn’t matter if they are a coach, activator, facilitator, instructor, leader, teacher or trainer. Whatever the label, the end result is always the same – by providing great coaching, they are inspiring others and making a difference.

During the week, UK Coaching will also be galvanising policymakers to invest in developing great coaches across all communities in the UK so that everyone has access to great coaching experiences, inspiring them to be active for life.

UK Coaching’s Director of Coaching Emma Atkins, said:

“We know that great coaching can drive positive sport and physical activity experiences, helping to deliver a healthier, more active and cohesive society.

“Coaching Week 2019 will not only demonstrate the value of coaching to communities and how coaches improve social connections and well-being, but create a movement that brings great coaching to the lives of many more people.”

Coaching Week


UK Coaching’s CEO Mark Gannon, said:

“Great coaching can have a transformative effect on physical and mental well-being, and on individual, social and economic development. It can increase self-esteem and self-worth, boost confidence and encourage resilient habits. Importantly, these effects are felt by both the participant and the coach.

“The purpose of Coaching Week is to extend what we already know to as many people as possible. We want more people, including partners and stakeholders, to see coaching as part of a solution to problems within our communities, for the benefit of everyone.”

Leading tennis coach and supporter of Coaching Week Judy Murray, said:

“As a child I learned how to play both badminton and tennis through community clubs in Dunblane and I started out coaching as a volunteer at our local tennis club, so I have experienced the benefits of coaching in the community as both a recipient and a contributor.

“Coaches create the environments that help us to develop a sense of belonging and give us the opportunities to grow our social and physical skills.

“They are also the driving force behind participation in sport and physical activity in local communities across the UK, so I am delighted to see this as the focus of this year’s Coaching Week.”

Keep up to date with Coaching Week 2019 as it develops. To find out more, visit ukcoaching.org/coachingweek

Incorporated by Royal Charter Charity registration number 1144545

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